Case Studies | Didit

Case Studies

Didit Doubled Online Retailer’s Revenue

Our client, which just celebrated their 60th year in business, offers home improvement products and high-end small appliances. They wanted to build a search-friendly site that would expand their online visibility and generate more customers.ChallengesOur client had top rankings for their primary keyphrase, but was invisible for other relevant tier-one and tier-two keyphrases. Relatively few of their product pages were indexed, leading to low acquisition of long-tail traffic. Inceptor realized that their information architecture focused their link popularity on low-priority pages and limited their indexing. Furthermore, they lacked strong category pages that were relevant to customer search terms.SolutionWe analyzed the site’s HTML code, use of dynamic navigation, content and metadata, and internal and external linking structure. We designed new category-level pages that increased visibility for tier-one and tier-two keyphrases. We organized the product pages to support the link popularity of these categories and provide logical shopping paths for visitors.ResultsThe new information architecture increased the number of indexed pages and created greater visibility for both high-volume, high-competition keyphrases and for the vast numbers of long-tail keyphrases. Once the new site was launched, the client’s organic traffic increased by 60% over the previous year in the first month, and by nearly 200% within six months. The number of sales increased by 79% in the first month, and by 239% in six months.

Keyword & Account ROI Increased via Brand Match Type Management
IntroductionThere are a number of well-known benefits to buying brand terms in paid search marketing. Having a paid search ad in addition to your organic listing will generate more total revenue to your site than the organic listing will alone. Brand keyword buys also allow brand messaging and promotions to be updated in real time, instead of having to change your site and wait for engines to update your organic listings. And, you can prevent competitors from buying your name and diverting sales meant for your business. However, a branded keyword strategy should be more than simply buying your brand terms on Broad or Advanced match.ChallengeIn 2007, after Google introduced expanded Broad match, we observed average CPCs of brand terms increase by 209% and in some cases by as much as 226%. Similarly, when Yahoo! changed its advanced match algorithm in 2009, CPCs for brand terms increased 140% with some increasing as much as 190%. At the same time, traffic volumes driven by these match types increased significantly. However, neither engine drove an increase in revenue, bringing down account ROI. Our client’s brand keywords were only on Broad match in Google and Advanced match in Yahoo!. We needed to ensure that we were getting as much brand traffic as possible, while improving the efficiency of the brand keyword buys.ApproachWe expanded our brand keywords to include all match types in both Google and Yahoo. All other variables (ad text, bids and others) were unchanged during this time period. Once we had acquired enough data, we analyzed the performance of each match type.ResultsWe observed that the CPCs for Broad match in Google were higher than for the other matches, probably because the Broad keywords were now only being triggered by less-relevant searches. These high-CPC, inefficient searches had been obscured by the high ROI of the more relevant traffic that the Broad terms had previously also captured. Once the relevant, high-ROI searches were instead being captured by Phrase and Exact match keywords, only the less-relevant, inefficient searches triggered the Broad keywords.The chart below shows the results of buying all three match types for brand terms in Google:The Broad-match terms drove significantly less ROI than Phrase and Exact. As shown in the next chart, the brand campaign’s average CPC decreased by 85%, while ROI increased 661% after we paused the Broad-match terms.Further, the ROI across our client’s Google account as a whole increased 26.8%, from 771% to 978%.The same exercise was performed for Yahoo!’s Advanced and Standard matches, and resulted in an average CPC decrease of 394% ($0.34 to $0.09), with an ROI increase of 470% (343% to 1,612%). Additionally, the ROI for Yahoo! as a whole increased 40%, from 571% to 800%.ConclusionWhile branded terms will usually be the highest ROI and revenue-generating keywords, Broad or Advanced match brand keywords may drive a higher level of inefficiency due to the non-relevant searches that trigger them. Since brand terms typically drive the most click volume to your site, it is important to make sure that you are maximizing the revenue and ROI that your brand terms deliver. For some websites, buying brand terms only on Phrase and Exact match in Google, and on Standard match in Yahoo, delivers the greatest amount of revenue at the highest ROI. However, it is always recommended to test as results may vary across websites.The Broad-match terms drove significantly less ROI than Phrase and Exact. As shown in the next chart, the brand campaign’s average CPC decreased by 85%, while ROI increased 661% after we paused the Broad-match terms.Further, the ROI across our client’s Google account as a whole increased 26.8%, from 771% to 978%.The same exercise was performed for Yahoo!’s Advanced and Standard matches, and resulted in an average CPC decrease of 394% ($0.34 to $0.09), with an ROI increase of 470% (343% to 1,612%). Additionally, the ROI for Yahoo! as a whole increased 40%, from 571% to 800%.ConclusionWhile branded terms will usually be the highest ROI and revenue-generating keywords, Broad or Advanced match brand keywords may drive a higher level of inefficiency due to the non-relevant searches that trigger them. Since brand terms typically drive the most click volume to your site, it is important to make sure that you are maximizing the revenue and ROI that your brand terms deliver. For some websites, buying brand terms only on Phrase and Exact match in Google, and on Standard match in Yahoo, delivers the greatest amount of revenue at the highest ROI. However, it is always recommended to test as results may vary across
Maximizing Conversions by Running Competitive Sites
Introducing additional partner, micro- or promotional sites with the intent of increasing overall conversion rates has proven to be an effective strategy for several Didit clients*. Multiple sites tend to fall into three categories:

  • Partner sites that fall under the umbrella of the main company
  • Micro-sites to promote different areas of the business
  • Promotional sites to target specific products or audiences within the company’s vertical

The challenge with all three is to increase conversions even as the competitive nature of the multiple sites threatens to raise the cost per click (CPC).SituationA client in a highly competitive financial vertical planned to launch two micro-sites in addition to its main website. Although each of the sites varied only slightly in messaging, the intent was to raise overall conversions by appearing in more places on the first page of paid search results for the same keywords. In effect, they wanted to take these spaces away from some of their deep-pocket competitors.ChallengesWhile each site had its own unique purpose, the keyword lists for all three were exactly the same. This created a risk of driving up CPCs for the original site. In addition, the duplicate sites and keyword lists raised the potential for conflict with Google’s editorial guidelines for duplicate/mirror sites.SolutionInceptor advised the client against launching all three sites at once; instead we together decided to benchmark the original site for three months, optimize the account and use the data collected to create a plan for launching the additional sites.During the three month test, Didit worked with Google to gain approval to add the first micro-site. After the data from the initial launch was analyzed, the site was activated using the same keyword list, but with CPCs set around 30% lower than the main site. This was to ensure that there would be no direct competition among sites.After six months of running the original site and the first micro-site with the exact same keyword lists, and finding higher overall conversions, the second micro-site was launched. Originally, it was expected that it would rank lower than the first two sites, but this quickly changed when the conversion rate of the second micro-site nearly doubled that of the first. ResultsManaging an account with three sites all competing for the same keywords seemed, at least initially, to be a risky idea, but with careful planning and optimization, the strategy proved sound.

  • Adding the first micro-site increased average monthly clicks by 68% while average spend increased by only 60%
  • Adding the second micro-site only increased average monthly spend by 4%
  • Average monthly conversions increased by a total of 114% after the second micro-site was launched
Content campaign raised brand awareness and drove 300% ROI increase
A Content campaign is an integral component of the Search Marketing mix. While Content campaigns are considered primarily as a vehicle for general branding, they can be leveraged to efficiently increase direct sales as well. Targeting the Content campaign to specific branded products and optimizing with a focus on conversions not only improved ROI but continued to drive traffic for branding.SituationA multi-channel retail client offered a line of celebrity-branded cookware and kitchen tools. A small mix of brand and product keywords was included in a single Content ad group for testing purposes. While the initial launch delivered sales and a positive ROI, the overall traffic was low, and therefore the branding goal was not met.ChallengesThe brand name value of the product line was under-utilized; the campaign needed optimizing for growth in traffic. At the same time, the ROI needed to be acceptable in order to develop a scalable Content campaign strategy for the rest of the branded product lines.SolutionThirty days after the initial launch, we implemented specific Google-recommended campaign optimizations designed to grow volume and increase brand visibility. The number of ad groups was expanded, with each group targeting a specific product. Also, Google added a large number of general keywords, high traffic product-level keywords, and celebrity chef-related keywords to each ad group. We tracked traffic to help determine which non-converting ad groups, keywords and ad copy needed to be changed or removed.After thirty days of running the Google-optimized Content campaign, we made more changes aimed at decreasing the non-converting traffic and lowering the cost of the campaign. Because the Content Network does not allow the use of negative keywords and match types, the delivery of ads for general keywords could not be sufficiently targeted. Consequently, most of the general keywords and other non-performers were removed, while the overall structure of the new ad groups remained. After optimization, each ad group was limited to 5 – 8 keywords for a specific product. In addition, the ad copy was updated to include promotions and calls to action, so that researchers would be more likely to become buyers. The test continued for another thirty days.ResultsOptimizing with a focus on direct sales via product and celebrity name-specific keywords resulted in an improved ROI, while driving significant traffic for branding purposes. Although the general keywords Google recommended for the Content campaign increased the number of impressions and clicks (and the costs,) it was not a scalable, efficient, or targeted program.The optimization performed by Google drove a 1200% increase in traffic but at a return of less than 100%. After our second round of optimizations, the ROI improved upon the Google optimization by over 300%. In addition, the revenue remained consistent and traffic increased by 380% over the initial launch period.
New CSE program drives significant revenue and ROI
Supplying product data feeds to Shopping Comparison Engines (CSEs) can help retail clients to grow revenue with excellent ROI However, CSEs require a tremendous amount of management in order to be successful; the feeds must be customized to each engine, and must be frequently updated to reflect inventory changes. Most businesses do not have the technical resources or the time to devote to optimizing their product data feeds. Inceptor has seven years of experience and proprietary tools that enable us to efficiently and effectively manage CSE accounts.SituationA national specialty retailer came to us in mid-2008 for help with their search engine marketing program. They were looking for help in expanding revenue without sacrificing efficiency. Their very mature PPC program had reached a level where continued expansion was decreasing its ROI. Rather than remain focused solely on PPC, we recommended launching a CSE program. The client had previously tried Shopping Comparison Engines with in-house resources. The campaigns were paused due to poor performance: click traffic that drove few orders.ChallengesThe company has thousands of product variables to manage, including sizes, colors and other options. Inventory, pricing, and bids needed to be changed often, but the large data set made manual updates time-consuming and difficult to perform. The client needed a more efficient way to manage their product data feeds.SolutionThe Inceptor team built a highly customized CSE program that updates product information daily. We tailored the feed to each shopping engine to exploit differences in each engine’s use of metadata and search results display formats. We also helped the client set up internal systems to aggregate inventory changes, allowing us to incorporate them automatically. We managed the client’s huge and varied inventory with our proprietary monitoring and performance analysis technology. Our tools automatically set bids based on ROI goals, and identify inefficient categories or products, allowing us to manage and optimize feeds down to the SKU level. Our optimization experts quickly identify high- and low-performing categories and SKUs, and can adjust the feeds, metadata, and other factors to maximize results.ResultsDuring the first six months, the new CSE program drove significant revenue at an ROI comparable to the PPC program. Thus, we were able to deliver increased revenue from a program that the client had previously found to be unprofitable.CSE Case Study – Inventory Interface
Integrated PPC-SEO Services Improve Lead Generation for a Biotechnology Firm
SITUATIONA world leader in the production and supply of reagents for the life science industry maintained a complex database of technical reference information about the enzymes they make available for genomic research.  This biolab sells tens of 1000s of products to the biotechnology research community.As part of their plan to implement a new Content Management System (CMS) and then undertake a major site redesign, the firm’s marketing team recognized that the use of SEO best practices would play an important role in the success of their new website.  At the same time, a relatively small budget was allocated to PPC and was managed with in-house resources.CHALLENGEThe client’s goal is to increase exposure to their target audience, biotech researchers, and develop new qualified leads, both those who are searching for a specific product and those who are looking for a general source of enzymes to purchase for their firm.   Given the wide assortment of niche technical terms involved, determining the key scientific terms to target as keywords for specific product pages is relatively straightforward.  However, it is more challenging to improve the home page rankings for general terms, such as “reagents” and “restriction enzyme,” which would best attract potential purchasers.As the CMS implementation proved more complicated than anticipated, it became apparent that the project needed the undivided attention of the in-house marketing team. There wasn’t enough bandwidth to continually test and optimize PPC campaigns.At the same time, the client continues to expand its product offerings into new areas which required additional keyword research and campaign design.  Technical conferences and their ongoing research publications are another source of new keywords to attract the biotech community to the site.SOLUTIONThe client signed up for Inceptor’s SEO consulting and support services to minimize any negative impact on organic rankings resulting from the implementation of the new CMS and design.  Since the redesign was expected to be a lengthy process, the Inceptor SEO team also researched and documented some interim optimization steps that would require minimal effort but improve visibility and/or usability for the existing website.  These short term improvements included addressing technical issues, such as the proper use of redirects; deploying a keyphrase strategy that focused on conversion goals; improving page relevance for specific terms by optimizing metadata and page copy; and providing guidance for low-cost information architecture improvements.Nine months after starting the SEO engagement, the client began using Inceptor’s PPC management services with the goal of making the best use of their limited PPC budget.  The Inceptor paid search team performed keyword research by leveraging learnings from the SEO team, applied negative keywords, revised ad copy, and restructured the search engine accounts to make tightly defined ad groups.The synergy between the PPC and SEO teams resulted in expanded traffic and provided additional opportunities for keyword identification and testing:

  • While PPC ads may go offline due to budget constraints, organic results are available to searchers at all times.   On the other hand, if organic results slip due to an algorithm change, PPC can temporarily ramp up to fill the void.
  • Using PPC with well-targeted ad copy for both branded terms and some well-chosen general keywords (along with adequate negative keywords to maintain relevance) helped to attract cost-effective clicks.
  • SEO techniques helped overcome the challenge encountered when Google does not display paid ads for infrequently searched, very specific keywords with a low CTR.
  • Appearing in both paid and organic search results on the same page helped to boost the total click through rate.

RESULTSThe number of organic visits from non-branded search terms improved by 75% year over year.  The top traffic-driving organic terms are specific technical terms, such as  “ecori” and “xhoi.” Meanwhile, as a result of the first six month’s of Inceptor’s PPC campaign restructuring and optimization efforts, the paid search Click through Rate improved by 1594% while the number of impressions dropped by 80%.  The well-targeted ads and better CTR improved the Google Quality Score and led to a 39% drop in CPCs and an improvement in average position from 2.7 to 2.1.  The top performing non-brand PPC keywords include relatively general terms such as “enzyme,” and “gene expression,” as well as some more specific terms like “DH5.“The CMS implementation is close to completion and the redesign project is still in progress, so the full impact of applying SEO principles is yet to be realized and fully measured.   And the PPC program is just getting underway, with improvements anticipated as additional optimization, Sitelinks, and testing techniques are implemented.Applying paid and organic search to the types of  terms for which they are each best suited allows the client to reach the broad spectrum of biotech researchers, whether they are looking for a specific product, technical reference information about certain enzymes, or simply for a reputable source of enzyme products.